Savannah, GA

I am still Moderating Safety at  Sea seminars while we complete the Great Loop route, Dorothy requires we stop in nice cities while I fly back to the Great Lakes. Savannah, GA, was one of those stops. We stopped at Isle of Hope Marina, just out side of Savannah. Isle of Hope is nestled in the middle of a scenic Historic District, and sits serenely on a bluff 40 feet above the banks of the river.  Our friend Sandra came to visit SEASONS for a couple of days and they played tourists.

Sandra and I headed out to Tybee Island Light Station and Museum. The light station dates back to 1736. The tower stands 145 feet tall and has three Light Keeper’s Cottages nearby to visit. Ordered by General James Oglethorpe, Governor of the 13th colony in 1732, the Light Station has been guiding mariners safe entrance into the Savannah River for over 285 years. Sandra and I arrived on a winding day and had to climb quickly to the top (wind was 23 mph and they close the tower at 25 mph).

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View from the top

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Refreshments are required after a long climb. Rum floaters on top.

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The Savannah College of Art and Design was having an art festival at Forsyth Park and Sandra is shining like the sunflower.

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The Waving Girl, a statue of Florence Martus, who waves a handkerchief at passing ships on the Savannah River in hopes that her departed sailor-lover is on one of them.

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Wormsloe Historic Site is a 1736 Colonial Estate. Noble Jones around 1737, began construction of a fortified tabby house overlooking the major water route that ran past his property. The War of Jenkins’ Ear interrupted construction of the house twice. Jones competed his fortified home in 1745. Noble Jones rarely stayed at Wormsloe and the tabby house deteriorated. In 1828 his son George, started construction on a dwelling about a half-mile north of the original house. Since the construction seven generations of George Jones’ descendants have made the house their primary residence up to the present day.

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Just a few of the things to do in Savannah, We need to stop here again.

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